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9/16/22, 3:46 PM Assignment 3.2- Team Dynamics: Integration Diagram

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Assignment 3.2- Team Dynamics: Integration Diagram
9/16/2022

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You’ve now completed 3 articles and 1 video, in addition to the class lectures. For this assignment,
you’ll synthesize and integrate (i.e. distill and then merge in a meaningful way) all of this content
and create a single, 1-page diagram/figure/graphic (i.e. NOT a written narrative) that shows how
the KEY content from the readings and video fit together. In other words, create a visual
model or framework for team effectiveness based on Module 3 content.

This could be a table, a mind map, a chart, etc. (just NOT sentences or paragraphs). You must use
key elements from ALL of the following, and reference each using the corresponding number.
For example, if you include Trust in your model (from Lencioni’s video), you would reflect it as “Trust
(5)” wherever it appears. Let’s say you see it connecting with Collaborative Ability from Hass &
Mortensen — you would put the two in proximity to each other [however you chose to do that] and
notate “Collaborative Ability (1)”.

1. The Secrets of Great Teamwork (Hass & Mortensen)
2. Making Dumb Groups Smarter (Sunstein & Hastie)
3. Teamwork on the Fly (Edmondson)
4. The Five Dysfunctions of Teams (Lencioni video)

Think of it as masterful note taking — you are creating a model/diagram that helps you better
understand the key elements from each article AND how they relate to each other (i.e. ‘connect the
dots’/content in a meaningful way); this should ultimately result in the creation of a 1-page
framework or guide for you to use in the future when leading teams (based on the ‘best practices’
from your course readings and resources).

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9/16/22, 3:46 PM Assignment 3.2- Team Dynamics: Integration Diagram

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HBR.ORG JUNE 2016
REPRINT R1606E

SPOTLIGHT ON MANAGING TEAMS

The Secrets of
Great Teamwork
Collaboration has become more complex, but
success still depends on the fundamentals.
by Martine Haas and Mark Mortensen

For the exclusive use of P. Korlagunta, 2022.

This document is authorized for use only by Pramodh Korlagunta in MANA 5360-020-Fall 2022 taught by Cynthia St John, University of Texas at Arlington from Aug 2022 to Sep 2022.

ARTWORK Jeff Perrott, RW13 (Fair Game), 2010
Oil on canvas; Museum of Fine Arts, BostonSPOTLIGHT

2  Harvard Business Review June 2016

SPOTLIGHT ON MANAGING TEAMS

For the exclusive use of P. Korlagunta, 2022.

This document is authorized for use only by Pramodh Korlagunta in MANA 5360-020-Fall 2022 taught by Cynthia St John, University of Texas at Arlington from Aug 2022 to Sep 2022.

Martine Haas is an
associate professor of
management at the
Wharton School at the
University of Pennsylvania.
Mark Mortensen is an
associate professor of
organizational behavior
at INSEAD.

The Secrets
of Great
Teamwork
Collaboration has become more
complex, but success still
depends on the fundamentals.
BY MARTINE HAAS AND MARK MORTENSEN

Today’s teams are different from
the teams of the past: They’re
far more diverse, dispersed,

digital, and dynamic (with frequent
changes in membership). But
while teams face new hurdles, their
success still hinges on a core set of
fundamentals for group collaboration.

June 2016 Harvard Business Review 3

FOR ARTICLE REPRINTS CALL 800-988-0886 OR 617-783-7500, OR VISIT HBR.ORG

For the exclusive use of P. Korlagunta, 2022.

This document is authorized for use only by Pramodh Korlagunta in MANA 5360-020-Fall 2022 taught by Cynthia St John, University of Texas at Arlington from Aug 2022 to Sep 2022.

The basics of team effectiveness were identified
by J. Richard Hackman, a pioneer in the field of or-
ganizational behavior who began studying teams
in the 1970s. In more than 40 years of research, he
uncovered a groundbreaking insight: What matters
most to collaboration is not the personalities, atti-
tudes, or behavioral styles of team members. Instead,
what teams need to thrive are certain “enabling con-
ditions.” In our own studies (see the sidebar “About
the Research”), we’ve found that three of Hackman’s
conditions—a compelling direction, a strong struc-
ture, and a supportive context—continue to be par-
ticularly critica

HBR.ORG DECEMBER 2014
REPRINT R1412F

Making Dumb
Groups Smarter
The new science of group decision making
by Cass R. Sunstein and Reid Hastie

For the exclusive use of P. Korlagunta, 2022.

This document is authorized for use only by Pramodh Korlagunta in MANA 5360-020-Fall 2022 taught by Cynthia St John, University of Texas at Arlington from Aug 2022 to Sep 2022.

MAKING DUMB GROUPS
2  Harvard Business Review December 2014

For the exclusive use of P. Korlagunta, 2022.

This document is authorized for use only by Pramodh Korlagunta in MANA 5360-020-Fall 2022 taught by Cynthia St John, University of Texas at Arlington from Aug 2022 to Sep 2022.

Cass R. Sunstein is the Robert
Walmsley University Professor at
Harvard Law School. Reid Hastie
is the Ralph and Dorothy Keller
Distinguished Service Professor of
Behavioral Science at the University

of Chicago Booth School of Business.
They are the authors of Wiser:
Getting Beyond Groupthink to Make
Groups Smarter (Harvard Business
Review Press, 2015), from which this
article is adapted.

The new science
of group
decision making
by Cass R. Sunstein
and Reid Hastie

JO
SH

M
CK

IB
LE SMARTER

FOR ARTICLE REPRINTS CALL 800-988-0886 OR 617-783-7500, OR VISIT HBR.ORG

December 2014 Harvard Business Review 3

For the exclusive use of P. Korlagunta, 2022.

This document is authorized for use only by Pramodh Korlagunta in MANA 5360-020-Fall 2022 taught by Cynthia St John, University of Texas at Arlington from Aug 2022 to Sep 2022.

have made decisions in groups. As the saying goes,
two heads are better than one. If so, then three heads
should be better than two, and four better still. With
a hundred or a thousand, then, things are bound to
go well—hence the supposed wisdom of crowds.

The advantage of a group, wrote one early ad-
vocate of collective intelligence—Aristotle—is that

“when there are many who contribute to the process
of deliberation, each can bring his share of goodness
and moral prudence…some appreciate one part,
some another, and all together appreciate all.” The
key is information aggregation: Different people take
note of different “parts,” and if those parts are prop-
erly aggregated, they will lead the group to know
more (and better) than any individual.

Unfortunately, groups all too often fail to live up
to this potential. Companies bet on products that
are doomed to fail, miss out on spectacular oppor-
t

HBR.ORG ApRil 2012
reprinT r1204D

Spotlight on the SecretS of great teamS

Teamwork
On the Fly
how to master the new art of teaming
by Amy C. Edmondson

For the exclusive use of P. Korlagunta, 2022.

This document is authorized for use only by Pramodh Korlagunta in MANA 5360-020-Fall 2022 taught by Cynthia St John, University of Texas at Arlington from Aug 2022 to Sep 2022.

Teamwork
On the Fly

How to master the
new art of teaming
by Amy C. Edmondson

artwork andy gilmore, Hemicube
2011, digital drawingSpotlight

if you watched the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games, you probably
marveled at the Water Cube: that magnificent 340,000-square-
foot box framed in steel and covered with semitransparent, eco-
efficient blue bubbles. Formally named the Beijing National
Aquatics Center, the Water Cube hosted swimming and diving
events, could hold 17,000 spectators, won prestigious engi-
neering and design awards, and cost an estimated 10.2 billion
yuan. The structure was the joint effort of global design and
engineering company Arup, PTW Architects, the China State
Construction Engineering Corporation (CSCEC), China Con-
struction Design International, and dozens of contractors and
consultants. The goal was clear: Build an iconic structure to re-
flect Chinese culture, integrate with the site, and minimize energy

2  Harvard Business Review april 2012

Spotlight on THe SecReTS of GReaT TeamS

For the exclusive use of P. Korlagunta, 2022.

This document is authorized for use only by Pramodh Korlagunta in MANA 5360-020-Fall 2022 taught by Cynthia St John, University of Texas at Arlington from Aug 2022 to Sep 2022.

foR aRTicle RepRinTS call 800-988-0886 oR 617-783-7500, oR viSiT hbr.org

For the exclusive use of P. Korlagunta, 2022.

This document is authorized for use only by Pramodh Korlagunta in MANA 5360-020-Fall 2022 taught by Cynthia St John, University of Texas at Arlington from Aug 2022 to Sep 2022.

Spotlight on THe SecReTS of GReaT TeamS

consumption—on time and within budget. But how
to do all that was less clear.

Ultimately, Tristram Carfrae, an Arup structural
engineer based in Sydney, corralled dozens of peo-
ple from 20 disciplines and four countries to win the
competition and deliver the building. This required
more than traditional project management. Suc-
cess depended on bridging dramatically different
national, organizational, and occupational cultures
to collaborate in fluid groupi

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