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See the below files for details. The first file indicates the questions for these two cases. 

The second file is the lecture of this class. 

The third and fourth articles are the articles of the cases.

Global Economic Competitiveness

Student Name:



You must read the requirements first:

1. Please make sure you

use your own words and provide detailed answers
.

· For questions that are worth 10 points: aim your answers to a quarter of page.

· For questions that are worth 15 points and 20 points: aim your answers to at least half page and maximum one page.

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· Your answers must be specific for the question right away!

· Unless otherwise specified and required,
your answers must be based on the case only.

· Never simply say a yes or not but provide your reasons!

2. Please answer all the questions using this document.

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This template is already formatted this way, so please do not change any formatting

You do not need to cite the case. No outside sources.

Read


Social Media War 2021: Snap vs. Facebook vs. TikTok

and answer the questions:

1. Snapchat has always wanted to be different. Read the sections of “Snap-The Early Days”, “Separating Social from Media”, and “Scaling the Enterprise”, discuss how Snapchat pursued the differentiation strategy, and comment on whether Snapchat is truly different.
(10 points) (Minimum a quarter of pages)


Start your answers below:

2. Read the sections of “The Competition” and “Snap and Facebook Go to war” and the relevant Exhibits of the case: comparing Snap vs. Facebook
based on the case only, what are the advantages of Facebook? What are the advantages of Snap, if any?
(20 points)
(Minimum a half of pages)


Note:

your answers should consider the products & services offered, business model, market share, market reactions, political/legal risk, and market/financial numbers.


Start your answers below:

3. Read the section of “The Competition” and the relevant Exhibits of the case: comparing Snap vs. TikTok
based on the case only, what are the advantages of TikTok? What are the advantages of Snap, if any?
(20 points) (Minimum a half of pages)


Note:

your answers should consider the products & services offered, business model, market share, market reactions, political/legal risk, and market/financial numbers.


Start your answers below:

4. Now let’s conduct the industry struct

Lecture 2:
Competitive Advantage of Firms in Global Industries

How firms create and sustain competitive advantage in their industries in order to explain what role the nation plays in the process.

9-721-443

A P R I L 8 , 2 0 2 1

Professor David B. Yoffie and Research Associate Daniel W. Fisher prepared this case. This case was developed from published sources. Funding
for the development of this case was provided by Harvard Business School and not by the company. HBS cases are developed solely as the basis
for class discussion. Cases are not intended to serve as endorsements, sources of primary data, or illustrations of effective or ineffective
management.

Copyright © 2021 President and Fellows of Harvard College. To order copies or request permission to reproduce materials, call 1-800-545-7685,
write Harvard Business School Publishing, Boston, MA 02163, or go to www.hbsp.harvard.edu. This publication may not be digitized, photocopied,
or otherwise reproduced, posted, or transmitted, without the permission of Harvard Business School.

D A V I D B . Y O F F I E

D A N I E L W . F I S H E R

Social Media War 2021: Snap vs. Facebook vs.
TikTok

Working from home in early 2021, Snap CEO and co-founder Evan Spiegel pondered how he should
fight the ongoing social media war with Facebook and TikTok. After its IPO in 2017, Snap had struggled
with a declining user base and large losses (see Exhibit 1A, Snap Financial Information). In the
meantime, Facebook had surged to almost 3 billion users and TikTok, a social media app run by the
Chinese company ByteDance, had attracted more than 700 million users in just three years.1 Snap
ended 2020 with 265 million users.2 Snap’s core product, Snapchat, had captured the attention of a
younger demographic through a simple innovation: allowing users to send disappearing messages to
their friends. Snap further innovated with new features like Stories and augmented reality (AR) Lenses.
But each time Snapchat introduced a powerful new feature, its largest rival, Facebook, copied it. As
one journalist observed: “There is a joke in Silicon Valley that Snap is Facebook’s product lead…
Facebook doesn’t have to think of new ideas anymore—it just has to mimic new Snapchat features and
distribute them to its larger user base.”3

2020, however, may have been a turning point: Snap’s revenues started to grow again, and users
were sending over 5 billion Snaps every day (up 40% year-over-year).4 Part of the explanation was that
Snap’s competition had been rocked by controversy. Facebook faced withering critiques over its spread
of misinformation as well as several antitrust lawsuits. At the same time, India banned TikTok, fearing
that data from the app was controlled by the Chinese government. Several other countries, including
the U.S., were threatening to do the same.

Spiegel wondered how to capitalize on Facebook and TikTok’s problems. An obvious question was:
Had fears over privacy and declining trust at Facebook and TikTok created an opportunity? Spiegel
and his

9-521-011

R E V : S E P T E M B E R 2 9 , 2 0 2 0

Professors Sunil Gupta and Rajiv Lal and Case Researcher Olivia Hull (Case Research & Writing Group) prepared this case. It was reviewed and
approved before publication by a company designate. Funding for the development of this case was provided by Harvard Business School and
not by the company. HBS cases are developed solely as the basis for class discussion. Cases are not intended to serve as endorsements, sources of
primary data, or illustrations of effective or ineffective management.

Copyright © 2020 President and Fellows of Harvard College. To order copies or request permission to reproduce materials, call 1-800-545-7685,
write Harvard Business School Publishing, Boston, MA 02163, or go to www.hbsp.harvard.edu. This publication may not be digitized, photocopied,
or otherwise reproduced, posted, or transmitted, without the permission of Harvard Business School.

S U N I L G U P T A

R A J I V L A L

O L I V I A H U L L

Facelift at Olay (A)

On October 4, 2017, Procter & Gamble (P&G) North America Skin Care General Manager Chris
Heiert received an email from a senior leader.

Any perspective on Jul/Aug/Sep Olay sales? The sales report shows sales are -12%, a
significant miss on a low estimate. My guess is there must be some special causes in the
quarter and wanted to get your thoughts on whether the plan will return Olay sales to
grow in Oct/Nov/Dec and whether you still plan to deliver your sales growth promised
for the fiscal year.

Heiert had seen good and bad quarters at Olay, a P&G-owned brand, over the course of his career.
When he first joined as an Assistant Brand Manager in 2000, Olay was just establishing itself as the
leading skincare brand in the world.

By the time Heiert rejoined the brand in 2015, however, Olay’s sales had been declining consistently
for several years. Each year, Olay lost 5% to 10% of its consumer base for the past five years. Every
valiant attempt to fix the situation failed. From its peak at over $2 billion in retail sales in 2009, sales
had fallen to just over $1 billion in retail sales by fiscal year 2017. (See Exhibit 1a for Olay’s global sales
growth year-over-year since 2000 and Exhibit 1b for U.S. sales from 2010-2016.)

Heiert needed to act fast to revive Olay. But how? There was no shortage of ideas on the table—he
and his team debated everything from brand equity, new consumer groups, kickstarting innovation,
altering their marketing and distribution models, and what categories the brand should play in.

The brand needed an immediate turnaround. If Olay could not reverse course, P&G might consider
divesting the brand. In a deal in 2015, P&G had already sold off 43 beauty brands to Coty Inc.

Procter & Gamble
In 2017, P&amp

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