Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Prior to beginning work on this assignment, read the Climate Change investigation manual. This lab enables you to explore concepts related to global climate including, the greenhouse effect, albedo, and melting land and sea ice. The Process Take the requi | excelpaper.org/
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  • Prior to beginning work on this assignment, read the Climate Change investigation manual. This lab enables you to explore concepts related to global climate including, the greenhouse effect, albedo, and melting land and sea ice.
  • The Process
  • Take the required photos and complete all parts of the lab assignment (calculations, data tables, etc.). Use the Lab Worksheet as a resource to complete the Lab Report Template. Transfer any answers and visual elements from the Lab Worksheet into the Lab Report  Template. You will submit the Lab Report Template through Waypoint in the classroom.
  • The Assignment
  • Make sure to complete all of the following items before submission:
  • Before you begin the assignment, read the Climate Change investigation manual; you may also wish to review the video, SCI207 – The Scientific Method (Links to an external site.).
  • Complete all activities using materials in your kit, augmented by additional materials that you will supply. Photograph each activity following these instructions:
  • When taking lab photos, you need to include in each image a strip of paper with your name and the date clearly written on it.
  • This lab will require you to make two line graphs and one bar graph. Should you desire further guidance on how to construct a graph, it is recommended that you review the Introduction to Graphing lab manual. (You are not expected to complete any of the activities in this manual.)
  • Use the Lab Worksheet as a guide to complete the Lab Report Template.
  • Must use at least two credible sources outside of the textbook and lab manual.
  • Submit your completed “Lab Report” via Waypoint.


Lab Worksheet

Hypotheses

Activity 1.

Activity 2.

Activity 3.

continued on next page

Observations/Data Tables

Data Table 1: Modelling the Greenhouse Effect

Time (min)

Bare thermometer

(degrees C)

Thermometer in cup (degrees C)

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

continued on next page

Data Table 2: Modelling Albedo

Time (min)

Temperature of water in cup with dark paper on the top

(degrees C)

Temperature of water in cup with aluminum foil on the top (degrees C)

Temperature Difference (degrees C)

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

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Running head: NAME OF LAB

1

Running head: NAME OF LAB

3

Name of Lab

Your Name

SCI 207: Our Dependence Upon the Environment

Instructor’s Name

Date

*This template will enable you to produce a polished Lab Report. Simply complete each section below, pasting in all your completed data tables, graphs, and photographs where indicated. Before you submit your Lab Report, it is recommended that you run it through Turnitin, using the student folder, to ensure protection from accidental plagiarism. Please delete this purple text, and all the instructions below, before submitting your final report.

Title of Lab Goes Here


Introduction

Background paragraph: Provide background on the lab topic, explaining the key concepts covered in the lab and defining (in your own words) important terms relating to the lab. Explain why the lab topic is important to scientists. Using APA format, cite at least two outside credible sources (sources other than textbook or lab manual) in your statement.

Your background paragraph should be 5-7 original, substantive sentences long.

Objectives paragraph:

In 4-5 sentences, explain the purpose of this lab. What is it intended to examine or test?

Hypotheses paragraph: State your hypotheses for this lab. Be sure to cover all the lab activities, one at a time. For each hypothesis, explain why you originally thought that would happen.

Note: Do not mention the actual results of the lab here – they go later in the report.

For additional help in writing your Introduction section, refer to the Ashford Writing Center Resource,

Introductions and Conclusions
.


Materials and Methods

Using your own words, describe what you did in each of the lab activities. Answers should enable a lab report reader to repeat the lab just as you did it – a process known as
replication. Clearly explain any measurements you made (including the measurement units).


Results

Data Tables: Copy and paste each of your completed data tables here, in order (
Weeks One, Two, Four, and Five Labs only).

Observations: Provide your observations for each lab activity here, in order (
Week Three Lab only)

Graphs: Paste your graphs
here (
Week Four Lab only). Include a numbered figure caption below each one, in APA format.

Photographs: Paste your photographs here, in the order they were taken in the lab. Include numbered figure captions below eac

Introduction to Graphing
Investigation
Manual

2 Carolina Distance Learning

INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHING

…………………………………..
…………………………………

……………………………………

Table of Contents

2 Overview
2 Objectives
2 Time Requirements
3 Background
7 Materials
7 Safety
7 Activity
9 Activity 2
11 Activity 3

Overview
Scientific investigation requires the analysis and interpretation of
data. Knowing how to graph and what the different components
mean allow for an accurate analysis and understanding of data. In
this investigation you will practice creating graphs and use some
simple statistical tools to analyze graphs and datasets.

Objectives
• Cr eate graphs from datasets, both by hand and electronically.
• Analyze the data in the graphs.
• Compare the slope of trendlines to interpret the results of an

experiment.

Time Requirements
Activity 1: Graphing by Hand 20 minutes
Activity 2: Computer Graphing 20 minutes
Activity 3: Linear Regression 20 minutes

Key
Personal protective
equipment
(PPE)

goggles gloves apron
follow
link to
video

photograph
results and

submit

stopwatch
required

warning corrosion flammable toxic environment health hazard

Made ADA compliant by
NetCentric Technologies using
the CommonLook® software

continued on next page

3www.carolina.com/distancelearning

Background
Science requires the collection of data to test
hypotheses in order to see if it supports or
does not support ideas behind the experiment.
Collecting data creates a record of observations
from experiments that is needed to ensure the
ideas in a hypothesis are accurate. This allows
the scientist to better understand the processes
they are investigating. Sharing data is critical
since it allows other scientists to examine the
experimental setting and draw conclusions
based on the data obtained. It also allows for
the replication and comparison of data obtained
in the experiment to confirm results and conclu-
sions. This will aid in the understanding of a
scientific principle.

Table 1, shows data from a study of plants. Two
types of plants, wheat and rye, were grown
over 8 weeks, and the height of the plants were
measured in centimeters (cm).

The aim of this experiment was to examine
growth rates of the two plant types in
comparison with each other in order to
find out which grows under a certain set of
environmental circumstances.

When looking at an experiment, the
experimenter is typically looking at variables that
will impact the result. A variable is something
that can be changed within an experiment.
A

Climate Change
Investigation
Manual

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

CLIMATE CHANGE

Overview
In this lab, students will carry out several activities aimed at
demonstrating consequences of anthropogenic carbon emissions,
climate change, and sea level rise. To do this, students will model
how certain gases in Earth’s atmosphere trap heat and then how
different colors and textures of surfaces reflect differing amounts
of sunlight back into space. They will create models of sea level
rise resulting from melting of sea ice and glacial ice and examine
the effects of this potential consequence of climate change.
Students will critically examine the model systems they used in
the experiments.

Outcomes
• Explain the causes of increased carbon emissions and their likely

effect on global climate.
• Discuss positive and negative climate feedback.
• Distinguish between glacial ice melt and oceanic ice melt.

Time Requirements
Preparation …………………………………………………………… 15 minutes
Activity 1: Modeling the Greenhouse Effect ………………. 30 minutes
Activity 2: Modeling Albedo ……………………………………. 40 minutes
Activity 3: Sea Ice, Glacial Ice, and Sea Level Rise ……. 30 minutes

2 Carolina Distance Learning

Key
Personal protective
equipment
(PPE)

goggles gloves apron
follow
link to
video

photograph
results and

submit

stopwatch
required

warning corrosion flammable toxic environment health hazard

Made ADA compliant by
NetCentric Technologies using
the CommonLook® software

Table of Contents

2 Overview
2 Outcomes
2 Time Requirements
3 Background
9 Materials
9 Safety
9 Preparation
10 Activity 1
11 Activity 2
12 Activity 3
13 Graphing
13 Submission
13 Disposal and Cleanup
14 Lab Worksheet

Background
For the last 30 years, controversy has
surrounded the ideas of global warming/climate
change. However, the scientific concepts behind
the theory are not new. In the 1820s, Joseph
Fourier was the first to recognize that, given
the earth’s size and distance from the sun,
the planet’s surface temperature should be
considerably cooler than it was. He proposed
several mechanisms to explain why the earth
was warmer than his calculations predicted,
one of which was that the earth’s atmosphere
might act as an insulator. Forty years later,
John Tyndall demonstrated that different
gases have different capacities to absorb
infrared radiation, most notably methane (CH4),
carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O),
all of which are present in the atmosphere. In
1896, Svante Arrhenius developed the first
mathematical model of the effect of increased
CO2 levels on temperature. His model predicted
that a doubling of the amount of CO2 in the
at

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