Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Please respond to both of the following two (2) questions (minimum 250 words). 1) Why does Farish Noor compare historical records that might appear contradictory in the way that they boastfully acknowledge OR erase colonial violence in Southeast Asia? 2 | excelpaper.org/
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Please respond to both of the following two (2) questions (minimum 250 words).

1) Why does Farish Noor compare historical records that might appear contradictory in the way that they boastfully acknowledge OR erase colonial violence in Southeast Asia?

2) Mann mentions that a “domestic racism” and an “international racism” are connected. What does this mean? How did the connection between these influence suffragists’ views of imperialism?

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Please look at the pictures and illustrations at bottom and respond to both of the following two (2) questions (minimum 250 words).

3) Said says that, “The relationship between the Occident (the West) and the Orient (the East) is a relationship of power, of domination, of varying degrees of a complex hegemony…” (highlighted on p. 49).”

How do you believe that the Picture #1 (at bottom) of a Singapore port might illustrate this, alongside Said’s thesis of Orientalism?
Now, look at Picture #2, which is taken by a Chinese photographer. How do you think this picture might have challenged Orientalist views of its time?

Note: I found Pictures #1 & 2 during archival research and limited information is available on them. Picture #1 includes no British or white people. The manual laborers (without shirts) are Chinese. The public officers (working for the British colonial government; in white dress) are likely Malay (who are native to the peninsula where Singapore is located). Picture #2 is a Chinese laborer in Singapore. (Links to an external site.)

4) Maryam Khalid states that: “[G]endered and orientalist identities, meanings, and images construct and organise the way we give meaning to and interpret our world, its people and events, and ‘the positions and possibiities for action within them’.” and then declares that “gendered narratives in the War on Terror have also relied on the (re)production of orientalist stereotypes.” Please provide (with brief explanation) two examples used by Maryam Khalid to support these statements.

Sociological Inquiry

, Vol. 78, No. 4, November 2008, 461–489
© 2008 Alpha Kappa Delta
DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-682X.2008.00257.x

Blackwell Publishing IncMalden, USASOINSociological Inquiry0038-02451475-682X©2008 Alpha Kappa DeltaXXXOriginal ArticlesFEMINISM AND IMPERIALISM, 1890–1920SUSAN A. MANN

Feminism and Imperialism, 1890–1920: Our
Anti-Imperialist Sisters—Missing in Action from

American Feminist Sociology*

Susan A. Mann,

University of New Orleans

This article retrieves part of our historical past to address two omissions in American
feminist sociology on the subject of global imperialism. The first section addresses the
inadequate attention feminist sociologists have paid to how major leaders of the
women’s movement responded to U.S. overseas expansion in the late nineteenth and
early twentieth centuries. It documents how these early feminists had both progressive
and reactionary responses to the anti-imperialist struggles of their era. Particular emphasis
is given to how issues of race, class, and gender were interwoven in their discourses on
imperialism.

The second section focuses on how the writings of the most famous woman theorist
and critic of imperialism during this era—Rosa Luxemburg—are virtually ignored in
U.S. portrayals of feminist sociology and women founders of sociology. To address this
omission, Luxemburg’s theory of imperialism is examined, as well as how it has
influenced contemporary global feminist works. A critical analysis of these Luxemburg-
inspired works considers their implications for understanding global imperialism today.
In this way, the past is used to clarify the present.

Introduction

Beginning in the 1960s, reclaiming our historical past has been a major
activity and accomplishment of the feminist movement in the United States.
This excavation of earlier feminist writings and activism not only served to
legitimize feminism as a serious and ongoing political struggle, but it also
unearthed the subjugated knowledges of those whose theory and practice had
been buried, silenced, or deemed less credible by more androcentric historical
narratives. To the credit of those who have reclaimed our past, great efforts have
been made to discover the diverse standpoints, visions, and voices of our feminist
predecessors. By doing so, we have learned much about the relationship
between women’s oppression and other systemic forms of oppression that
affected U.S. women, such as racism, classism, and heterosexism (Cott 1987;
Giddings 1984; Lerner 1993; Rossi 1974).

However, even with this greater emphasis on diversity, our gaze has been
too inward and United States-centered. This myopic, nation-centered gaze has

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DON’T MENTION THE CORPSES: THE ERASURE OF VIOLENCE IN

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History may be written by the victors, but what they conveniently leave out can be more telling. Farish Noor reminds us of the violent side of

colonial conquest.

“All conquest literature seeks to explain to the conquerors ‘why we are here’.”1

– Robert Bartlett, The Making of Europe (1993)

G The court of the Sultan of Borneo, with the audience chamber filled with natives, all well dressed and armed. The sultan

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