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Kindly use the following questions as guidelines to your assigned case study:

  1. What challenges does Shelby Givens face:
  2. During Phase I (Preparing for the Transformation)
  3. During Phase II (Renovation and Grand Opening)
  4. During Phase III (2011/2012 Operations)
  5. By the end of the case, what has Givens done to address the challenges outlined at each stage listed in Question (1) above?
  6. Which of the actions executed by Givens were most successful in resolving the challenges? Which were least successful? What other options might Givens have pursued?
  7. Is Sugar Bowl a viable business? Which forces have the most positive, or negative, impact on the business’s profitability?
  8. Givens considers two paths for Wednesday night entertainment: league bowling and exclusive band rights.
  9. Which option will generate more revenue in the short term? Long term?
  10. Is revenue how success should be measured? Which path do you think is best for Sugar Bowl, and why?
  11. Once Sugar Bowl’s financials are more stable, what changes could Givens make to build a stronger organization and culture?

EX 1 – Balance Sheet

Balance Sheet
December 31, 2006-2012 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash $ 35,488 $ 24,473 $ 29,667 $ 9,057 $ 298,806 $ 66,594
Inventory $ 15,412 $ 6,571 $ 2,943 $ 4,200 $ 24,005 $ 83,950
Fixed Assets
Property, Plant & Equipment $ 54,007 $ 132,103 $ 184,122 $ 178,046 $ 408,500 $ 658,962
Total Assets $ 104,907 $ 163,147 $ 216,732 $ 191,303 $ 731,311 $ 809,506
LIABILITIES
Accounts Payable $ 14,907 $ 15,000 $ 25,000 $ 30,000 $ 25,488 $ 51,995
Debt $ 40,000 $ 121,567 $ 94,850 $ 124,208 $ 724,208 $ 724,208
Total Liabilities $ 54,907 $ 136,567 $ 119,850 $ 154,208 $ 749,696 $ 776,203
EQUITY
Common Stock $ 30,000 $ 30,000 $ 130,000 $ 130,000 $ 130,000 $ 130,000
Retained Earnings $ 20,000 $ (3,420) $ (33,118) $ (92,905) $ (160,490) $ (96,697)
Total Equity $ 50,000 $ 26,580 $ 96,882 $ 37,095 $ (30,490) $ 33,303

Ex 2 – Income Stmt.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

HBS Professor Richard G. Hamermesh and writer Alisa Zalosh prepared this case solely as a basis for class discussion and not as an
endorsement, a source of primary data, or an illustration of effective or ineffective management. Although based on real events and despite
occasional references to actual companies, this case is fictitious and any resemblance to actual persons or entities is coincidental.

Copyright © 2012 President and Fellows of Harvard College. To order copies or request permission to reproduce materials, call 1-800-545-7685,
write Harvard Business Publishing, Boston, MA 02163, or go to http://www.hbsp.harvard.edu. This publication may not be digitized,
photocopied, or otherwise reproduced, posted, or transmitted, without the permission of Harvard Business School.

R I C H A R D G . H A M E R M E S H

A L I S A Z A L O S H

Sugar Bowl

Shelby Givens checked her watch as she jogged along Raleigh’s Greenway Trail; she was running
late again. Since Sugar Bowl’s launch, there simply were not enough hours in the day to satisfy the
overwhelming demands on her time. Givens couldn’t remember the last time she went to dinner and
a movie with friends. And though three months had passed, she still deeply regretted missing her
college roommate’s wedding because of an unanticipated staffing crisis.

Givens had thought that by now, April 2012, a full year after the bowling lounge’s opening, her
fast-paced and sometimes sleepless entrepreneurial life would be slower, or at least more predictable.
But that simply wasn’t the case. Givens loved Raleigh and her job—managing her family’s bowling
legacy was thrilling, professionally rewarding, and potentially lucrative. Profits were on the rise (See
Exhibits 1 and 2 for Sugar Bowl financial statements) but the continual personal sacrifice was starting
to wear on her. Was this how she wanted to spend the remainder of her twenties? On the other
hand, what job would ever be as fulfilling or as stimulating as the one she had now?

Sugar Bowl’s board meeting was two weeks away, scheduled for April 30, 2012. Givens had some
exciting opportunities to present to her investors. It was imperative, though, that she work through
her own priorities—financial and otherwise—in advance of that meeting. What was best for Sugar
Bowl wasn’t necessarily best for Givens. Or was it?

Background

After graduating from business school in 2009, Givens returned to her native Raleigh, NC to
implement a turnaround of Westlake Lanes. The ailing seventies-style bowling business was started
by her deceased grandfather, Dane Sugar, in an old mill in downtown Raleigh. Guided by an
entrepreneurial spirit and interest in general management, Give

INCOME STATEMENT QUARTERLY ANNUAL
Westlake Sugar Bowl Sugar Bowl Sugar Bowl Sugar Bowl Westlake Sugar Bowl
Q3 2010 Q2 2011* Q3 2011 Q4 2011 Q1 2012 2010 2011
Income
Lane Rental $ 118,290 $ 106,707 $ 179,021 $ 275,400 $ 267,540 $ 398,850 $ 561,128
Food Sale $ 17,150 $ 70,392 $ 159,667 $ 448,500 $ 410,270 $ 56,920 $ 678,559
Liquor Sale $ 20,571 $ 99,460 $ 243,763
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