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Follow instructions at the JOURNAL ASSIGNMENT (see attachment)

Chapter 12: Structure for Managing Emergency Response

Article Name:

“Florida officials seek tourism boost after Alberto blows through”

Article Review:

The Emergency Operations Center should be the most important building of any community.

This is where all the knowledge and nuts and bolts to keep the safety, economy, and welfare of

all the citizens and dynamics of a city or county, flowing. Every part of our country has its own

hazards, from California and earthquakes, wildfires and tsunami threats, to hurricanes, tornadoes,

and floods in the South and Midwest. Every EOC has its own set of emergency plans based on

the threat assessment.

I bring up economy because you see it every storm season, disasters blow in and everyone flees,

including the tourists which would have spurred the economy but now are gone, and so is the

economy. Disasters not only pull down the economy, and the lack of needed tourism, but then is

the increased cost of preparing, mitigating, and recovery of disasters and emergencies. Hurricane

season started in the south, and now Florida is trying to pull back in tourists in between storms. I

understand that, but I also see a risk involved. According to one source, “As winds and rains let

up from Subtropical Storm Alberto, Florida officials Tuesday were quickly spinning ways to

draw tourists to areas that may have missed out on Memorial Day crowds” (Turner, 2018, para.

1). The Governor of Florida visited an EOC to thank them for a job well done for this first storm

as he was questioned about tourism efforts. He said, “The Legislature gave us $76 million again

this year (for visit Florida), and part of that money is to work on when we have something like

this, to let people know we’re back open for business” (Turner, 2018, para. 5). The EOC is the

hub and is excellent at tracking emergency and disaster situations before they happen, when

possible, and that success is shown by minimal loss of life and property.

When greed steps in, that is when you see tourism take a back seat, but most who have been

through the big storms know those risks, and you see a good attitude with the Governor of

Florida in this article who knows what his State is facing. It shows a good leader also who shows

appreciation to those he knows keeps the public safe.

WC 375

Turner, J. (2018, May 30). Florida officials seek tourism boost after Alberto blows through.

Florida Division of Emergency Management. Retrieved from

http://www.floridadisaster.gov/FloridaofficialsseektourismboostafterAlbertoblows

through

Research & Report

For your Week 3 Journal Assignment, you should find
two articles that relates to the material covered in your reading this week:

·
Chapter 9: Homeland Security and Weapons of Mass Destruction

·
Chapter 10: Cyber Crime and Terrorism

·
Chapter 11: Terrorist Financing

Use any peer reviewed resources (Keiser University Library sources or
government websites ( .GOV better) to find an article that discusses the same topic. Then write in an APA review of the article. You should submit
two of these. Submit them in the same document.

Requirements:

· Complete two article reviews.

· Each review should have a minimum of 250-350 words.

· Each review should explain the significance of the article and relate it to your reading this week.

· Each review should end with your opinion on the pros or cons of the article being reviewed.

·
Note: Do NOT use any articels older than 5 years.
This field is always changing, so you should be using current information (no older than five years).

·
Note: Do NOT simply cut-and-paste from a website or from an article. Yes, you should be sources to find the information for this journal assignment, but do not simply cut-and-paste someone else’s words. As you review the article, put it in your own words. Be sure to cite in APA. If you copy and paste, you will NOT get credit for doing this. Your reviews must be your own words, thoughts, and analysis.

Resources:

·
Homeland Security Journal Rubric

Homeland Security Journal Rubric – Alternative Formats

· Example Student Journals:

·
Example 1 – “Florida Officials Seek Tourism Boost after Alberto Blows Through” – Alt

Criteria No
Submission:
O Points

Emerging (F
through D range)
12 points

Satisfactory (C
Range)
14 points

Proficient (B Range)

16 points

Exemplary (A Range)

20 points

Criterion
score
20/20

Thesis and Ideas:
Explores the
appropriate topic based
on chapters read in the
week and displays
college level thinking
Submits the correct
number of Journal
articles.

Student did
not submit
the
assignment

Work does not
meet assignment
expectations;
shows little or no
understanding of
assignment
concepts

Assignment
partially meets
expectations with
minimal depth;
demonstrates a
limited
understanding of
the assignment
concepts

Assignment meets
expectations with
all components
being addressed;
demonstrates the
ability to evaluate
and apply key
assignments

Assignment exceeds
expectations with
exceptional depth;
presents all
requirements of the
assignment;
demonstrates the
ability to evaluate,
apply and synthesize
key assignment
concepts

20/20

Criteria

No
Submission:

O Points

Emerging (F
through D range)

12 points

Satisfactory (C
Range)

14 points

Proficient B Range

16 points

Exemplary (A Range

20 points

Criterion
score
20/20

Comprehension:
Synthesizes
information and
communicates it
through student’s own
thoughts and words.

Student did
not submit
the
assignment

Work does not
meet assignment
expectations;
shows little or no
understanding of
assignment
concepts

Assignment
partially meets
expectations with
minimal depth;
demonstrates a
limited
understanding of
the assignment
concepts

Assignment meets
expectations with
all components
being addressed;
demonstrates the
ability to evaluate
and apply key
assignments

Assignment exceeds
expectations with
exceptional depth;
presents all
requirements of the
assignment;
demonstrates the
ability to evaluate,
apply and synthesize
key assignment
concepts

20/20

Criteria No
Submission:

O Points

Emerging (F
through D range)

12 points

Satisfactory (C
Range)

14 points

Proficient (B Range)

16 points

Exemplary (A Range)

20 points

20/20

Evidence critical and
analytical skills

Student did
not submit
the
assignment

Work does not
meet assignment
expectations;
shows little or no
understanding of
assignment
concepts

Assignment
partially meets
expectations with
minimal depth;
demonstrates a
limited
understanding of
the assignment
concepts

Assignment meets
expectations with
all components
being addressed;
demonstrates the
ability to evaluate
and apply key
assignments

Assi

Homeland Security and Terrorism

Second Edition

Chapter 11

Terrorist Financing

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

1

Learning Objectives

1. Explain how the terrorists financed the 911 attacks.

2. Explain the difference between money laundering and terrorist financing.

3. Discuss how the United States is attempting to reduce terrorist financing.

4. Describe how terrorist organizations raise money.

5. Describe how terrorist groups move money.

6. Discuss identity fraud and identity theft.

7. Explain how breeder documents work

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Terrorist Financing of the 9/11 Attacks

$300,000 Was Deposited in Bank

Moved to U.S. by Bank Transfer

Hijackers Carrying Traveler’s Checks to US

Credit or Debit Cards Used to Access Foreign Bank Account

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Distinguishing Terrorist Financing and Money Laundering

Money Laundering – Three Step Process:

Illegally Derived Money is Placed Into the Financial System

It is Layered or Moved Through the Financial System, Usually Internationally, and Intermingled With Legitimate Profits and Monies to Hide Its Provenance

It is Returned and Reintegrated Into the Legitimate Economy

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Federal Mechanisms Used to Counter Terrorist Financing and Money Laundering (1 of 2)

The Central Intelligence Agency

Bureau of Customs and Border Protection and Bureau of Immigration and Customs

U.S. Secret Service

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives

Drug Enforcement Agency

Federal Bureau of Investigations

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Federal Mechanisms Used to Counter Terrorist Financing and Money Laundering (2 of 2)

Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs

Office of the Coordinator for Counterterrorism

Executive Office for Terrorist Financing and Financial Crime

Financial Crimes Enforcement Network

Internal Revenue Service

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Means and Methods of Terrorist Financial Transactions

Earning or Acquiring Resources

Moving or Laundering the Money

Storing or Banking the Money Until It is Needed

Black Market Oil and Gas

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

E

Homeland Security and Terrorism

Second Edition

Chapter 10

Cybercrime and Terrorism

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

1

Learning Objectives

1. Identify the methods of attacking cyber infrastructure.

2. Distinguish between cyber crime and cyber terrorism.

3. Discuss the various sectors within America that are vulnerable to cyber attacks.

4. Identify the types of information that terrorist groups post on their Internet home pages.

5. Examine how terrorists use the Internet.

6. Describe the federal cyber counterintelligence agencies and their operations  I chnaged the Verb to a berb that is measurable.

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Methods of Attacking Cyber Infrastructure

Physical or Conventional Attack

Electronic Attack or Electromagnetic Pulse

Malicious Code

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Distinguishing Hacking, Cyber Crime, Cyber Terrorism, and Cyber Warfare

Hacking

Cybercrime

Cyber Terrorism

Cyber Warfare

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Hacking

Persons Who Deliberately Gain (or Attempt to Gain) Unauthorized Access to Computer Systems

Three Categories of Hackers

Nation States

Criminals looking for financial gain

Terrorists, Anarchists Gaining Access to Disrupt

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Cyber Crime

Attacks on financial institutions, businesses, and industries, including military installations

Cyber stalking

Obscenity, including child pornography

Child molestation (obtaining contacts)

Sex tourism, in which pedophiles seek underage victims

Distribution of digital hate

Communications among criminal and terrorist groups

Gathering of intelligence information on potential targets

Identity theft

Money laundering

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Cyber Warfare

Gain economic or military intelligence

Test another country’s defenses

Cripple another country’s weapons systems

Cripple another country’s military communications systems

Cause economic chaos

Military posturing or political bargaining

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Cyber Terrorism

The Use of Computer Network Tools to Harm or Shut Down Critical National Infrastructures

Ma

Homeland Security and Terrorism

Second Edition

Chapter 09

Homeland Security and Weapons of Mass Destruction

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

1

Learning Objectives

1. Define weapons of mass destruction (WMD).

2. Explain the history of the use of various weapons of mass destruction.

3. Distinguish between types of nuclear threats.

4. Explain how biological agents can be used as WMDs.

5. Describe the nature of chemicals and their use as WMDs.

6. Discuss how the various weapons of mass destruction can be delivered and their limitations

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Defining Weapons of Mass Destruction

Any explosive, incendiary, poison gas, bomb, grenade, or rocket having a propellant charge of more than four ounces, missile having an explosive or incendiary charge of more than one-quarter ounce, or mine or device similar to the above.

Poison gas.

Any weapon involving a disease organism.

Any weapon that is designed to release radiation at a level dangerous to human life.

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

History of the Deployment of Weapons of Mass Destruction

Historical Precedent for Biological WMDS

Historical Precedent for Chemical WMDS

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Historical Precedents for Biological WMDS

History of Use in United States

Individuals Rather Than International Groups Have Committed Terrorist Attacks Using Biological Weaponst

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Historical Precedents for Chemical WMDS

As Early as 1000 B.C. the Chinese Used Arsenic Smoke

Used Extensively in World War I

Used During World War II

Used in 1995 to Attack Subway Trains in Tokyo

Ricin Used in Las Vegas in 2008

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The Threat of Nuclear Weapons of Mass Destruction: Destructiveness, Potential for Use, and Availability

WMDS Present a Vexing Problem for Homeland Security

Three General Types of WMDS:

Nuclear

Biological

Chemical

Copyright © 2019, 2016, 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Nuclear or Radiological Attack Can Be Mounted in Several Ways:

Obtain a Nuclear Weapon, Smuggle into the U.S., and Detonate It

Combine Radiological Materials With a Conventional Explosive Device Across a Wide Area

Use Conv

Chapter:
Chapter 1 – Defining Terrorism

Article Title:
“Terrorism”

Chapter 1 of the text goes into much detail about defining terrorism and the types of terrorism.
What exactly constitutes terrorism and why does it seem so complicated to define? This article
from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI, 2021) defines terrorism as a “contested term, with
no set definition for the concept or broad agreement among academic experts on its usage ”
(para. 1). Is it really that difficult to define? It’s a word and as such it should just be in any old
dictionary or textbook glossary and boom there’s the definition. Is it more complicated than that?

To answer my own question, yes, it is very complicated. But at least I’m not alone in the
complicatedness of defining terrorism as it seems like the FBI is having problems too. The article
notes that “the recent spate of extremist attacks in the United States and Europe have highlighted
the difficulty of defining what constitutes ‘terrorism’” (FBI, 2021, para. 2). Here, The FBI
focuses on recent examples extremism to attempt to answer the question, even giving the readers
an account of some of the recent terroristic attacks and how the relate to terrorism and
extremism. By the end of the article the question remains unclear and unanswered, making this
task of defining terrorism that much more confusing.

The pro of this article is that there were some real-world examples. These help show the
complicated nature of defining terrorism.

The article would have been more interesting if there were some frontline details, like the
definition from the FBI’s perspective, especially given it’s the leading legal enforcement
mechanism in the country.

Words: 270

Reference

Federal Bureau of Investigation. (2021). What We Investigate: Terrorism. Retrieved from

https://www.fbi.gov/investigate/terrorism

Commented [JW1]: When citing from a webpage, you
must count the paragraphs and include a para. citation.

Commented [JW2]: Note how the quote within a quote
appears:
” ‘ ‘ ”

And note the citation here follows the quote since the
source was not mentioned before the quote.

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