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Describe any unhealthy family roles exhibited by Marge’s husband in the media.
Explain what roles her children have assumed when dealing with Marge’s addiction.
Select one of these unhealthy family roles.
Explain how this role could impact Marge and her family.
As an addictions professional, explain how you might address this unhealthy family role. Provide two resources that would be useful.

 Learning Resources
Required Readings
Doweiko, H. E. (2019). Concepts of chemical dependency (10th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage.
· Chapter 22, “Codependency and Enabling” (pp. 313-321)
· Chapter 23, “Substance Use Disorders and the Family” (pp. 304-312)

Gibson, B. (2016). A harrowing journey through codependency. Perspectives, 24(2), 3.

Margasiński, A. (2017). Psychological roles of young adults growing up in alcoholic and non-alcoholic families measured by Family Roles Questionnaire. Alcoholism and Drug Addiction, 30(1), 13-40.

Sharma, R. (2016). Role of Family relationship in child rearing of drug addiction afflicted vs normal families. Indian Journal of Health & Wellbeing, 7(8), 807-809.

Stenzel, W. (2018). Co-Dependency, a metastatic disease. Human Development, 39(1), 74–87.Stenzel, W. (2018). 

Codependency is not limited to family and friends of the person with problems with addiction. In your work in this field, you must continually ask yourself these four codependent questions to guard against having your well-intentioned helping hinder both the recovery of the person with problems with addiction and your role as a helping professional.

One of the most common ways that families attempt to maintain balance is by ignoring the addiction problem. Families attempt to keep a false sense of normalcy by following three rules: no talking, no feeling, and no trusting. Members learn to shield themselves from hurt by learning not to feel, and because their trust in the addicted parent or spouse has been violated one too many times, they learn not to trust.
Children growing up in these unstable families often adapt by taking on unhealthy roles. These roles each have distinct traits and are taken on for one reason only—to survive the dysfunctional family dynamics. These roles do nothing to help the child, the addicted parent, or other family members. If the situation does not change, these children may carry these roles into their adult lives and perpetuate similar addiction-related problems in their own families
.
For this Assignment, you examine unhealthy family roles. You explore how these roles might impact addiction recovery.

Assignment:

In a 2- to 3-page APA-formatted paper, address the following:

· Describe any unhealthy family roles exhibited by Marge’s husband in the media.
· Explain what roles her children have assumed when dealing with Marge’s addiction.
· Select one of these unhealthy family roles.
· Explain how this role could impact Marge and her family.
· As an addiction professional, explain how you might address this unhealthy family role. Provide two resources that would be useful.

Use virtual source for book : Concepts of chemical dependency 

User name: etallent9525@aol.com

Password: Landon2019!

Counseling Session 3

Counseling Session 3
Program Transcript

Welcome to Marge’s third counseling session, where you will ask questions to
determine if there are any codependent or family issues related to her addiction.
Before you begin, please carefully read through the paperwork that contains
information obtained from team members.

After reviewing this information, click the “continue” button to begin Marge’s first
counseling session. Using your cursor, rollover buttons A and B to review your
question options. Click what you think is the best question to ask Marge out of
the two options offered. If you ask an effective counseling question, you will
receive more information from Marge. If you ask an ineffective question, you will
receive an equally unhelpful response. Choose wisely, because the better you
counsel Marge, the better her treatment experience.

*Please keep in mind that the video has been made in a way that gives you a
realistic vantage point from where you would sit and counsel your client in real
life. A close up view of the individual has not been added because you, as a
counselor, will not have varying angles of your client to work with.

Paperwork:
• Marge C.
• 15th day out of 30 days of treatment
• Family sessions scheduled for today. Husband was interviewed

individually earlier today; the children will be interviewed later this

afternoon

• Patient is showing signs of improvement. Withdrawal symptoms have
disappeared, patient no longer takes a sedative

• Patient continues to exhibit signs of depression

[Marge’s 15th day, half-way through treatment. This is the first family session. The
children are not here for the first session; they will come later. Ken and Marge sit
next to each other across from the counselor/camera. Initially, their chairs are
turned toward the counselor/camera so they can face him or her. After the
counselor asks them to face each other, they turn their chairs directly facing each
other, their profiles to the counselor/camera.]

© 2014 Laureate Education, Inc. 1

Counseling Session 3

Question #1:

Option A:

Counselor: I’d like to ask you both to face each other in today’s session and talk
to each other. Ken, you expressed a lot of guilt the day Marge came here. You
said that you enabled her to continue drinking. Talk about that, both of you.

Marge: (faces Ken) You did the best you could, Ken.

Ken: (faces Marge. Ken’s body language begins to subconsciously show signs of
anger—clenched fist, tightens and loosens jaw, folds arm and crosses leg, looks
away, etc. But his tone of voice remains calm)

I did do the best I could. For years, I just turned my back on your drinking,
probably thinking it would go away if I ignored it. It didn’t. I always made excuses
for you, telling people you were ill or calling the school when you were too
hungover to go. I

Counseling Session 1

Counseling Session 1
Program Transcript

Welcome to the first day of counseling for Marge, an alcoholic who has just been
admitted to the addictions facility. Please carefully read the paperwork
developed by a support staff member during Marge’s intake process earlier
today. Marge’s husband, Ken, was also briefly interviewed during this time.

After reviewing this information, click the “continue” button to begin Marge’s first
counseling session. Using your cursor, rollover buttons A and B to review your
question options. Click what you think is the best question to ask Marge out of
the two options offered. If you ask an effective counseling question, you will
receive more information from Marge. If you ask an ineffective question, you will
receive an equally unhelpful response. Choose wisely, because the better you
counsel Marge, the better her treatment experience.

*Please keep in mind that the video has been made in a way that gives you a
realistic vantage point from where you would sit and counsel your client in real
life. A close up view of the individual has not been added because you, as a
counselor, will not have varying angles of your client to work with.

Paperwork:
• Marge C.
• 41-year-old female
• Married
• Husband, Ken, works two jobs to make ends meet, so he is not home

much. Husband noted that he didn’t know what else to do about his wife’s
drinking, and that he had brought her to the facility out of desperation.

• Patient has three children, ages 10, 12, and 16
• Patient was a teacher, but she lost job for alcohol-related reasons
• Patient had a one-car, alcohol-related accident three days earlier. She

received minor injuries and was issued a ticket for DUI. Husband, family
members, and friends determined that they needed to intervene to prevent
Marge from harming herself and/or others.

• An intervention occurred earlier today, culminating in her being brought for
treatment.

• Patient will go through a week of detoxification during her first week in
treatment to address the physical withdrawal from alcohol

[Opening scene: Marge’s admission into residential treatment. Her counselor is
meeting with her for the first time and is conducting Marge’s initial assessment.
Marge is disheveled, wears no makeup, and her eyes are red from crying. An
adhesive bandage is on her forehead, and she has a black eye and abrasions
from a one-car accident she had several days ago She was charged with driving
while under the influence, her first such charge.

© 2014 Laureate Education, Inc. 1

Counseling Session 1

Her posture is closed—arms crossed, turned away from counselor, and avoiding
eye contact initially. She is tremulous throughout the interview due to impending
physical withdrawal from alcohol. She tries to control her shakes but is not
successful. Her mood is l

Counseling Session 2

Counseling Session 2
Program Transcript

Welcome to Marge’s second counseling session, where you will ask questions to
determine the level of treatment needed to address her addiction and her
engagement level with her treatment. Before you begin, please carefully read
through the paperwork that contains information obtained from team members.

After reviewing this information, click the “continue” button to begin Marge’s first
counseling session. Using your cursor, rollover buttons A and B to review your
question options. Click what you think is the best question to ask Marge out of
the two options offered. If you ask an effective counseling question, you will
receive more information from Marge. If you ask an ineffective question, you will
receive an equally unhelpful response. Choose wisely, because the better you
counsel Marge, the better her treatment experience.

*Please keep in mind that the video has been made in a way that gives you a
realistic vantage point from where you would sit and counsel your client in real
life. A close up view of the individual has not been added because you, as a
counselor, will not have varying angles of your client to work with.

Paperwork:

• Marge C.
• Sixth day of detoxification treatment
• Patient is experiencing residual physical withdrawal symptoms. Patient is

shaky and groggy, has been given a mild sedative to keep her calm during
withdrawal

• Patient is cooperative and still open to treatment. Patient expressed
feelings of loneliness and concern for her children

• Patient exhibiting signs of depression

[About six days later, Marge is going through detoxification, which means she
may be a little groggy from sedatives and slightly shaky due to residual physical
withdrawal. Her appearance is plain but more kempt than on her admission; she
has no makeup, the bandage is removed, her abrasions are healing, and the
black eye is almost gone. She is composed, rather down, but cooperative and
still open to treatment.]

Question #1:

Option A:

© 2014 Laureate Education, Inc. 1

Counseling Session 2

Counselor: Marge, when we last met, you expressed resentment toward your
family and friends after the intervention they held with you. We left that as
unfinished business. Share with me your thoughts and feelings toward them now.

Marge:. Yeah, I was furious, but not so much now. I’m more ashamed than mad
and concerned that I let things get that bad. They all had written down examples
of some of the things I had done while I was drinking that concerned them, and
they read those things out to me.

Ethel, my older sister, said that my sons told her they were embarrassed when I
came to their soccer games because I’m always staggering around and falling all
over everyone. My best friend, Emma, told me she found me passed out one day
in the house wh

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