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Hey all,

I have these questions below that needs to be answer within 2 hours. It’s pretty simple and easy.

Also, attached is the Chapter for the question .

Let me know if you guys have any questions please.

Which of the following terms uses metrics based on company objectives to measure the value of a sponsorship?



a.

ROI



b.

ROO



c.

CSR



d.

none of the above


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Locations for signage include billboards, concourse, video boards, and dasher boards.

Select one:



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_________ refers to the concept whereby the price of single-game tickets fluctuates based on a wide range of supply and demand market factors such as the opposing team and the night of the week.



a.

Sporadic ticketing



b.

Ticket selling



c.

Direct ticketing



d.

Dynamic ticketing


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Which of the following is NOT one of the five top reasons for using social media?



a.

generate awareness



b.

connect with customers during the event



c.

improve brand perception



d.

receive likes


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A website is considered sticky when a user visits the site repeatedly and spends more time browsing than the average user.

Select one:



Governing bodies are sport organizations that have irregular and unsanctioned authority.

Select one:



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a.

short-term objectives; long-term benefits



b.

subtle marketing; goodwill



c.

short-term goals; long-term benefits



d.

none of the above


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a.

Sponsorship



b.

Marketing



c.

Partner



d.

Sponsee


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9

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Select one:



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a.

close the sale by developing a relationship with the person making the decision



b.

increase their network of potential customers



c.

reach the decision maker so that a sale can be made



d.

develop relationships with colleagues who can connect them to customers.

Which is a reason that corporations give away money?



a.

to reduce a surplus in their budget



b.

to funnel money away from their employees



c.

to build a positive public image



d.

all of the above


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12

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What is the main principle of corporate social responsibility?



a.

Companies should occasionally get involved in charity.



b.

Companies should take responsibility for their employees.



c.

Those with power should help those in need.



d.

None of the above.


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Corporate grants are _________ funds or products that are disbursed or given by a corporation.



a.

repayable



b.

nonrepayable



c.

large



d.

social


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___________ gifts are a type of philanthropy whereby companies financially match the donations that their employees make to nonprofit organizations.



a.

Corporate



b.

CSR



c.

Donated



d.

Matching


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For what reasons do companies employ CSR?



a.

Consumers demand it.



b.

Employees want to work for companies with world-positive missions.



c.

Both a and b.



d.

None of the above

Corporation leaders have responsibilities beyond profit and maximization.

Select one:



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The Head Health Initiative, Childhood Cancer Awareness Day at ballparks, and the NHL Green Initiative are all examples of CSR in sport.

Select one:



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Which set of the following factors explains why social responsibility in sport is distinct from and more powerful than CSR in other industries?



a.

passion, economics, stakeholder management, and transparency



b.

transparency, passion, communication, and community involvement



c.

passion, economics, stakeholder management, strong external pressure



d.

none of the above


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Companies incur little advantage when starting a foundation.

Select one:



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__________ can be a type of service event for employees.



a.

Food pantries and donation distribution centers



b.

Receiving permanent assets that are distributed for grants and operations



c.

Having a holiday party for employees



d.

All of the above

CHAPTER 6
Corporate and Foundation
Revenues
Corporate Social Responsibility
• The principle behind the idea of social responsibility is
that those with power should help those in need.
• Leaders of corporations understand they have
“responsibilities beyond profit maximization” (Babiak &
Wolfe, 2006, p. 215).
Unique Power of CSR in sport
• Passion—sport teams represent their host cities, and a
reciprocal relationship develops whereby team success is
often contingent on fan attachment and loyalty.
• Economics—the close ties between teams, leagues, local
host-city government entities, tourism providers, and many
other stakeholders all factor into the economics of sport.
(continued)
Unique Power of CSR in sport (continued)
• Transparency—fans and the media have greater
expectations for sport teams to be transparent than most
other industries.
• Stakeholder management—sport leagues are more
dependent on the cooperation of a large range of
stakeholders, such as the media, teams, fans, leagues,
sponsors, athletes, and so on.
Forces That Make CSR Important in Sport
• Positive internal resources—examples include youthful
appeal of sport and its positive health and social impacts.
• Strong external pressure—sport organizations are
economically structured in such a way that they are reliant
on public subsidies or infrastructures. For example, many
sport facilities are publicly financed using taxpayer monies
and are therefore expected to give back to the community.
Examples of CSR Initiatives in Sport
• National Football League
• Head Health Initiative
• Major League Baseball
• Childhood Cancer Awareness Day at ballparks
• National Hockey League
• NHL Green initiative
(continued)
Examples of CSR Initiatives in Sport (continued)
• English Premier League
• Primary Stars Program
• Colleges and Universities
• NC State’s Zero Waste Wolfpack
• National Basketball Association
• NBA Cares
Why Corporations Give
• Build a positive public image
• Increase revenues
• Receive tax deductions
• Reward employees
• Improve the communities in which they operate
• Support certain causes or events
• Gain favor with public and be perceived as exuding good
will
• Create an environment of community responsibility
• Be good corporate citizens who attracts new customers
Corporate Giving
• Corporate foundations with yearly funding—each year the
corporation transfers some of its pretax profits to the
foundation.
• Corporate foundation with permanent assets—the
corporation gives the foundation permanent assets
(usually stocks) at some point in time or over the course of
time.
(continued)
Corporate Giving (continued)
• Cash or product donations—corporations work with
nonprofits to donate cash or products.
• Company-wide day-of-service events—many companies
have created large volunteer events that impact the local
community and often bring together multiple partners.
• Checkout charity campaigns—point-of-sale donation
programs.
(continued)
Corporate Giving (continued)
• Corporate grants—nonrepayable funds or products that
are disbursed or given by a corporation.
• Corporate matching gifts—a type of philanthropy whereby
companies financially match the donations that their
employees make to nonprofit organizations.
• In-kind contributions—donations that are made in-kind can
consist of goods, services, or time, in place of cash.
(continued)
Corporate Giving (continued)
• Volunteer time off—many companies provide their
employees with paid days off to work with a charitable
organization.
• Pro bono service—refers to situations where services are
offered for free or at a cost but benefit a specific cause or
the public good.
Philanthropic Foundations
• Private foundations—a 501(c)(3) organization that is
established to fund charitable activities through grants and
other gifts.
• Community foundations—tax-exempt, nonprofit, publicly
supported philanthropic organizations that the Internal
Revenue Service (IRS) recognizes as a public charity partly
because of support from the public through endowment
funds and individual, family, or business donations.
(continued)
Philanthropic Foundations (continued)
• Operating foundation—special form of private foundation
that uses the bulk of its income to run its own charitable
programs or services.
Private Foundations
• Independent or nonoperating foundations—funded by
endowments from a single source.
• Family foundations—often the term family foundation is
used interchangeably with the term private foundation;
private suggests that the foundation possesses no
constituents or shareholders.
• Corporate foundations—separate legal entities that are
created and financially supported by the corporation.
(continued)
Private Foundations (continued)
• International foundations—typically these foundations
make grants to their own countries and overseas and are
based outside the United States.
• Private operating foundations—another type of private
foundation that operates as a 501(c)(3) organization that
does not qualify for public charity status because of limited
sources of support.
Community Foundations
• Maintain and administer funds on behalf of multiple donors
primarily to meet the needs of the community or region
where it is based.
• More than 750 community foundations operate in both
urban and rural areas in every state in the United States.
Operating Foundations
• Special forms of private foundations that use the bulk of
their income to run their own charitable programs or
services.
• Examples of operating foundations include the operation
of a museum, library, research facility, or historic property.
Applying the PRO Method
• Step 1: PROspect for qualified customers by researching
funding partners.
• Steps 2: PRObe for information with open-ended
questions.
• Step 3: PROvide solutions by matching program features
with funding guidelines.
• Step 4: PROpose an initiative that fits with the funding
client’s priorities.
Letter of Inquiry
• Introduction section—serves as the executive summary.
Include name of the organization requesting the grant,
description of the project, qualifications of project staff,
brief description of the evaluative methodology, the
amount requested, and a timetable.
• Organization description—Briefly discuss your
organization’s ability to meet the stated need; include a
brief history and description of your current programs.
(continued)
Letter of Inquiry (continued)
• Statement of need—convince the reader at the funding
organization that an important need can be met by your
project.
• Methodology—present a clear, logical, and achievable
solution to your earlier stated need.
• Final summary—restate the purpose of the project and let
the potential funder know that you are willing to answer
any questions.

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