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Week 6: Leaders and Followers

Theme 1: A leader can plan and strategize all they want, but they cannot succeed if the vision cannot be sold to others. Influencing people to follow is about creating trust, which is the building block of the leader-follower relationship.

Having a story is not enough! A leader must sell the story to others. This means a leader must learn about his or her own style, traits, knowledge, etc., in developing knowledge about others. The leader will create a relationship that will result in “others” following the strategic vision if successful. The leader-follower relationship is crucial to successfully selling the story to others. One truth to the leader-follower relationship is that the relationship must be based on mutual trust if it is to succeed.

Read/View Course Material:

Theme 2: Authentic Leadership and the Emotional Bank Account – If trust is the cornerstone of leadership, how do we get there? If there is one thing we have learned in our study of leadership, mutual trust is the most valuable element to the leader-follower relationship. Mutual trust requires authentic leadership Course Material.

——————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Discussion

Directions: Read the Case Scenario and answer the questions using course materials to support your reasoning and conclusions.

Case Scenario

Tisha Allen is Senior Vice President (SVP) of Life Sciences Nutraceuticals, Inc.(LSN) east coast operations. (The LSN company profile can be found in Week 1 above Discussion 1, although it is not specifically needed for this case.) Tisha has received your memo request to be considered for further leadership positions. You have been with the company for 12 years. You are now a senior analyst in the Management Effectiveness Division. You supervise 13 junior analysts. Your roles involve conducting a quality analysis of management practices in all LSN departments on a scheduled basis. You are highly valued by LSN’s leadership and known for your ability to work well with everyone and for being liked and respected by those you have supervised. After reading your memo to her, Tisha has decided to ask you to perform a specific function so she can observe your approach. She assigns you to help the Manager of Accounts Payable, Ken Count.

You walk over to Accounting and visit Ken. He is visibly upset. He has just received a performance review from his manager. This is a six-month review, as Ken was recently assigned to this role after working with great success for 10 years in another area of the Accounting Department. As part of this review, Ken’s manager interviewed the six members of the Accounts Payable section, who all report to Ken. Ken’s boss summarized their feedback in Ken’s performance evaluation. Ken shares this feedback with you:

“Ken marched in here thinking he knows everything. He doesn’t want to listen to any of our ideas. It’s his way or the highway.”

“We really don’t know Ken all that well. He keeps to himself, except of course when deadlines are due, and then he’s all over our backs.”

“He acts as if he is perfect. I’m scared of getting yelled at when I make a mistake.”

“Most times, Ken is fine, but when we have a deadline, he micromanages us. I literally dread coming in to work on days our accounts are due because I know Ken will be watching over us like a hawk.”

Based on your readings this week, answer the following questions, and support your answers with the course materials:

  1. What would you explain to Ken is the major reason for his subordinates’ issues with him?
  2. What are

    three

    specific recommendations you would make to Ken that would immediately improve the situation with his subordinates? You must use course materials to support your answer. (The three recommendations must not overlap with the three suggestions in #3.)
  3. What three specific course materials from this week’s course materials would you suggest to Ken that he should carefully review to enhance his future leadership development. You must explain the rationale for each of your three suggestions. (Thee three suggestions must not overlap with the three recommendations in #2.)

Completing the Discussion

  • Read the grading rubric for the project. Use the grading rubric while completing the project to ensure all requirements are met to lead to the highest possible grade. (Rubric is in the attachments)
  • Third-person writing is required. Third-person means that there are no words such as “I, me, my, we, or us” (first-person writing), nor is there use of “you or your” (the second person writing). If uncertain how to write in the third person, view this link:

    http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/first-second-and-third-person

    .
  • Contractions are not used in business writing, so do not use them.
  • Paraphrase and do not use direct quotation marks. Paraphrase means you do not use more than four consecutive words from a source document, but put a passage from a source document into your own words and attribute the passage to the source document. Not using direct quotation marks means there should be no passages with quotation marks, and instead, the source material is paraphrased as stated above.
  • Provide the page or paragraph number when they apply to in-text citations. Note that a reference within a reference list cannot exist without an associated in-text citation and vice versa.
  • You may only use the course material from the classroom. You may not use books or any resource from the Internet.

LEADERSHIP/MANAGEMENT
The Leadership Relationship. Part I:
Understanding Trust
Jo Manion, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN
LEADERSHIP EXISTS ONLY within the context
of a relationship. It is an intensely personal process
of relating to another person who, if influenced,
becomes a follower. If there are no followers, there
is no need for a leader. It makes sense, then, that
leadership is accomplished most effectively from
the base of a positive and healthy relationship
with others. And, in fact, without positive relationship and people skills, it is very hard to be an effective leader.
This column is based on the premise that having
positive relationship skills is an essential competency for all nurse leaders. This is true whether
your followers are your patients, coworkers on
the committee you chair, or employees who report
to you. Of course, a toxic and punitive leadership
relationship can also influence the follower but
not in a positive way. Our focus is on healthy and
empowering partnerships with others to achieve
the key results needed in the department.
This can be difficult news to hear for those who
aspire to lead, yet have few natural people skills,
or actual problems relating to other people. We
all know managers or supervisors who rely solely
on the legitimate authority of their position to
give direction and influence others. They expect
compliance to their directions simply because of
the positional authority they hold. Developing relationships with others is not a priority for them,
and little care is taken to establish a positive relationship. It is seen as unnecessary or wasted
time. However, these leaders are unlikely to be as
Jo Manion, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, is the Owner and Senior Consultant, Manion & Associates, The Villages, FL.
Conflict of interest: None to report.
Address correspondence to Jo Manion, Manion & Associates, 873 Greenwich Place, The Villages, FL 32163; e-mail
address: jomanion@sprintmail.com.
Ó 2015 by American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses
1089-9472/$36.00
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jopan.2015.01.006
Journal of PeriAnesthesia Nursing, Vol 30, No 2 (April), 2015: pp 153-156
fully effective as they would be with positive interpersonal skills.
Some fortunate people seem to have been born
with good people skills imbedded in their personality. It is much easier for them to develop good relationships with others. Other people feel good
about working with them, and they often establish
healthy and trusting relationships with others.
These individuals often move into leadership roles
(not necessarily management) as opportunities
arise.
If people skills are not as natural for you, do not
despair! This does not mean you are incapable of
becoming a good leader, but it does mean that
you will need to develop these skills. I once
worked with a nurse executive who had little to
no inherent people skills in her basic personality
makeup. However, she was a very effective nurse
leader. Over the years, she had developed and
honed her people skills to a fine degree. Relationships took more energy on her part to maintain
because these skills did not come naturally to
her. However, because she was deliberate and
conscious about cultivating her leadership relationship with others she was an extremely effective and successful nurse leader.
To some of you, talking about relationships may
feel like going back to Psych 101 because it seems
so basic. However, every one of us would benefit
from consciously examining the quality of the relationships in our lives, both personal and professional. It is an aspect of our lives that has a
tremendous potential for creating great outcomes
or significant issues and difficulties! The first step
is to spend some time reflecting on and assessing
your relationships with others.
To do this in a meaningful way, you need clarity
about what a healthy relationship is. There are at
least four essential components that characterize
a positive and healthy relationship. The absence
153
154
of any one of these elements damages a relationship. The four are trust, respect, support, and
communication. This column explores the
concept of trust, and the next column will explore
the remaining three elements.
Trust
Trust is the foundation necessary for any relationship to form and flourish. It is a necessary condition before a sense of connection can take place
between people. According to the dictionary, trust
means you can rely on the integrity, strength, or
ability of a person or thing. This confidence
implies that we trust because of good reasons, definite evidence, or past experience. If a colleague
assures you that he will reciprocate with you for
future schedule changes if you change days off
with him this time, you trust that he will do so
because he has lived up to that promise in the
past. When a new nurse joins the staff, we trust
that she or he has the competence to do the job
for which she or he has been hired.
Trust is absolutely crucial in the leadership relationship. Without trust or confidence in the leader,
people will not follow. Confidence is a reliance and
dependence on the person to obtain the results
that will benefit everyone. The leader may be
very articulate, charismatic, and personally liked.
However, if there are no results or improvements
because of the leader’s efforts, trust wavers.
Warren Bennis, a noted leadership scholar, offers a
concrete and applicable framework for understanding trust within the context of the leadership
role. He believes there are three essential ingredients for trust to occur: competence, congruence,
and constancy. Consider these in your assessment
process to understand why you are experiencing
trust or mistrust from others.
Competence is the possession of a required skill,
knowledge, qualification, or capacity. As a leader,
this means you must have the skills and knowledge
required to do the job, whatever it is. Confidence
in the leader develops from working with that person and seeing evidence of the leader’s past performance demonstrating competence and ability.
Both skill and knowledge are included in this definition of competence. Knowledge alone is insufficient. For example, you may know that your
JO MANION
followers need accurate information and clear
communication. If you are not able to articulate
clearly, you can have the best intentions in the
world and yet your effectiveness will be reduced.
On the other hand, you may be an articulate and
charismatic leader able to communicate beautifully with others, but if you are unable to back
up your rhetoric with performance and outcomes,
you will not have the trust of your followers.
Qualifications are an interesting factor in competence. For many nurses, there are very specific expected qualifications for the leader, and, if not
present, they will not follow that leader. For
example, most nurses would expect that the manager in the department has a clinical rather than a
business background. Whether the actual qualification prepares the individual for the role or not
is a moot point; to the follower, it is a critical issue
with significant repercussions. In one organization
I worked with recently, the nurse executive had
not attained her professional certification,
whereas many of her clinical directors had done
so. This individual was a very capable executive
and was producing solid results for the organization. Most of the directors reporting to her recognized and appreciated her skills and the results
they were able to attain together. However, one
of the clinical directors was absolutely adamant
that this nurse executive did NOT have the correct
qualifications for the position because she had not
yet achieved certification, and the clinical director
basically refused to follow the nurse executive’s
lead. She repeatedly engaged in behavior that sabotaged the leader. It became a very destructive situation within this leadership team and resulted in
the director’s resignation.
Capacity is another issue related to competence.
Many leaders today are overwhelmed with responsibilities, overscheduled with meetings, and
fraught with frustration around navigating their
system to achieve meaningful results. Followers
see this, and it naturally raises questions of trust
in terms of whether the leader has the capacity
to handle the current situation. If there has been
frequent turnover of leaders, there is the added
worry: ‘‘How long will this leader stay? Can she/
he handle the stress of the job?’’ A leader who appears frazzled and out of control creates uneasy followers. Inadequate capacity on the part of the
leader is not a personal incompetence to do the
LEADERSHIP/MANAGEMENT
work; however, it creates the same sense of
distrust that would result from the lack of skills
or knowledge.
So all these four aspects (skills, knowledge, qualifications, and capacity) influence a sense on the part
of the follower that the leader is competent to be
effective in their leadership role. It is possible for
the leader to overcome the mistrust of followers
by behaving in an obviously competent manner.
Let us take for example the dynamics that occur
when a new and relatively young staff member is
asked to accept leadership for a key staff committee. There may be a healthy amount of skepticism
on the part of other staff members. The new leader
will be tested repeatedly but can overcome the
mistrust by being well prepared and skilled at managing the committee meetings and by involving
and seeking input of those in the group. It may
be a difficult challenge for the new leader but is
certainly doable.
Congruence is the second element that creates a
sense of trust within a relationship. This means
that there is a consistency between the verbal
and written messages and the actual behavior of
the leader. When what a leader says is highly
congruent with her or his behavior, people
perceive the leader as honest and trustworthy. If
the leader says one thing and does another, the
result is an enormous credibility gap and trust is
severed. As a leader, your integrity and character
are critically important. Others do not necessarily
need to agree with everything you believe, but
they have to believe that you will be honest with
yourself and them as well. If you say you value
your people, you need to behave in a way that
demonstrates this value, otherwise you will lose
their trust.
One of the most serious problems with incongruent behavior is that it is inadvertent and often
goes unrecognized. As a leader you do not intend
to behave in a way that contradicts your previous
messages, but it can happen. For example, perhaps
you have told your staff that you will involve them
in decisions that are made in the department. At
the next department meeting, you make an
announcement about the new parking policy. Suddenly you are faced with push back and angry
resistance from the staff. ‘‘You told us we were
going to be involved in making decisions in this
155
department, and now you’re telling us we need
to park where?’’ When you become aware that
you are being seen as incongruent, this is an opportunity for you to either clarify or apologize. So in
this example, you might say something like: ‘‘You
are right, I did tell you I would involve you in decisions. However, I should have been clearer. I
meant that I would involve you in decisions that
are within our authority to make. The decisions
about parking are made by other people in this organization, not us.’’ So you have offered more
clarity. They still might not like the decision you
have announced, but they can clearly see it was
not your or their decision to make.
If, however, it is a decision where it would have
been reasonable to include them, you may need
to apologize. ‘‘I am sorry, and you are right. I am
so used to making these decisions that I didn’t
even think about asking you. Let’s back up and
take another look at the decision.’’ Although it is
uncomfortable to realize that you have been incongruent, when people give you this feedback, see it
as a gift. It gives you the opportunity to address
their confusion. Otherwise, they will simply see
you as not being trustworthy, and it will damage
your leadership relationship.
If your relationship with your followers is not one
based on trust, when you behave incongruently
they may assume it was intentional on your part.
If you have a relationship built on solid trust, the
people you work with will tell you when you are
being incongruent because they trust that you
did not mean to contradict yourself.
Constancy is the third and final essential ingredient of trust identified by Warren Bennis. It
implies that as a leader you are reliable, dependable, and consistent. If you make a promise or a
commitment, you follow through with it or you
immediately let the other person know why you
cannot.
For many followers, constancy also implies availability and accessibility. We have all had the experience of working with someone who assures us
they will be available if we need help and then
cannot be found when needed. Tight work schedules and overwhelming demands in the workplace
certainly reduce availability. However, an effective
leader has a way of being present for others, even if
156
it is for very short moments of time. Taking a
moment to really tune in and listen to an individual, stepping in and helping for a short time at a
critical point, and offering a reassuring presence
is very powerful in communicating availability.
Accessibility means other people know how to
find you and contact you if needed. Today’s work
world can be overwhelming with the constant demands and rapidly unfolding situations. Our
improved communication technology assists in
increasing accessibility and creating more problems because of increased accessibility. Electronic
mail, instant messaging, and texting have all
increased our ease in being available to others
while also creating a sense of urgency and overload
that causes stress to skyrocket. I have colleagues
whom I text to tell them I have sent an e-mail
that they need to read!
Managing accessibility is a key competency for any
leader. Physical accessibility is important, and the
most effective leaders find a way to provide it
even in today’s overcharged world. Letting people
in the department know where you are and when
you will return is helpful if you attend many meetings. Posting your schedule on the office door and
setting a specific time every day when you will be
available in the office are also helpful. Giving committee members your personal e-mail so they can
contact you with questions helps them feel like
you are accessible. Setting realistic boundaries
while maintaining a sense of accessibility for
others is a challenge, but effective leaders find a
way to do so. Although physical presence is most
powerful, even a short and quick response to a
text or e-mail can be reassuring to your follower
who has a question or is dealing with an issue.
Constancy in our behavior is also crucial, and it refers to a stability of personal characteristics. A
leader who experiences extreme fluctuations of
mood, is quick to anger, or responds with kneejerk reactions has more trust issues with others.
JO MANION
Although none of us is completely predictable,
the less volatility in the leadership relationship,
the more likely trust will develop.
Trust is the first essential component in establishing a positive and healthy relationship with others
from which you can effectively lead. To evaluate
the level of trust in your relationships with others,
ask yourself these questions:
1. Am I competent to do this work? Do others
see me as competent? Do they see me
achieve needed results? What has been my
track record? In what areas do I need to increase my skills and/or knowledge? Do I
have the qualifications needed for the
work, or do any of my followers question
that I am qualified? Do I have the capacity
to do what is needed?
2. Am I congruent in what I say and what I do?
Do others see me as trustworthy? Where
have I been incongruent? Has anyone told
me that I have been incongruent? Would
they feel comfortable telling me so? Do I
invite this kind of feedback? How have I responded in the past to this feedback?
3. Am I seen as constant by others? Have I been
available for my followers or am I so busy
that I am exhausted by the time I return to
the department near the end of the day?
Do people say they have a hard time finding
me? Do I respond promptly to messages
from my followers? Am I so frazzled and overwhelmed that listening to one more problem
will push me over the edge?
Trust is the solid foundation in any relationship,
and without the trust of your followers, your ability to influence them in the direction needed is
significantly impaired. The next column explores
the remaining three essential elements of a healthy
relationship: respect, support, and communication. Although these concepts seem simplistic,
they have a tremendous impact on your leadership
effectiveness.
4/15/22, 11:30 PM
Rubric Assessment – BMGT 365 7387 Organizational Leadership (2222) – UMGC Learning Management System
Week 6 Discussion – 10% – Fall 2021
Course: BMGT 365 7387 Organizational Leadership (2222)
Criteria
Identify the
major cause of
Ken’s issues
with
subordinates.
1.0
Equivalent to an A
Equivalent to a B
Equivalent to a C
Equivalent to a D
Equivalent to an F
1 point
0.85 points
0.75 points
0.65 points
0 points
Thorough
explanation of the
major cause of
Ken’s problem, with
full support of
course materials.
Explanation of the
major cause of
Ken’s problem, with
support of course
materials, but
needs some
development.
Explanation of the
major cause of
Ken’s problem, with
limited support of
course materials,
but needs
significantly more
development.
Explanation of the
major cause of
Ken’s problem, but
with no support of
course materials,
and needs
significantly more
development, or
incorrect
identification of
Ken’s problem.
Limited to no
attempt to identify
the root cause of
Ken’s problem.
(0.9 – 1.0)
(0.80 – 0.8)
(0.7 – 0.79)
Criterion Score
/1
(0 – 0.59)
(0.6 – 0.69)
https://learn.umgc.edu/d2l/lms/competencies/rubric/rubrics_assessment_results.d2l?ou=625383&evalObjectId=3743774&evalObjectType=5&userId=338108&groupId=0&rubricId=1411940&d2l_body_ty…
1/6
4/15/22, 11:30 PM
Criteria
Provide three
recommendatio
ns for Ken that
he can
immediately use
to help improve
the situation
with his
subordinates
supported by
course
materials. (The
Rubric Assessment – BMGT 365 7387 Organizational Leadership (2222) – UMGC Learning Management System
Equivalent to an A
Equivalent to a B
Equivalent to a C
Equivalent to a D
Equivalent to an F
1.5 points
1.275 points
1.125 points
0.975 points
0 points
Three
recommendations
for Ken’s problem
are provided, with
all three fully
supported by
course materials.
Three
recommendations
for Ken’s problem
are provided, with
some support from
course materials.
Two
recommendations
are provided with
support from
course materials, or
three provided with
no support from
course materials.
One
recommendation
provided with
support from
course materials, or
two provided with
no support from
course materials.
No attempt to
provide a
recommendation is
made.
(1.05 – 1.1)
(0.9 – 1.04)
(1.35 – 1.5)
(1.2 – 1.34)
Criterion Score
/ 1.5
(0 – 0.8)
three
suggestions
must not
overlap with the
three
recommendatio
ns in #3.) 1.5
https://learn.umgc.edu/d2l/lms/competencies/rubric/rubrics_assessment_results.d2l?ou=625383&evalObjectId=3743774&evalObjectType=5&userId=338108&groupId=0&rubricId=1411940&d2l_body_ty…
2/6
4/15/22, 11:30 PM
Criteria
Provide three
specific
suggestions of
course materials
from this week
that Ken should
make time to
review for the
betterment of
his future
leadership
development.
Must be
supported by a
clear rationale
for each
suggestion. 1.5
Rubric Assessment – BMGT 365 7387 Organizational Leadership (2222) – UMGC Learning Management System
Equivalent to an A
Equivalent to a B
Equivalent to a C
Equivalent to a D
Equivalent to an F
1.5 points
1.275 points
1.125 points
0.975 points
0 points
Three suggestions
of course materials
for Ken’s future
leadership
development are
provided,
supported with an
excellent and very
clear rationale for
each suggestion to
Ken.
Three suggestions
of course materials
for Ken’s future
leadership
development are
provided,
supported with a
very good but
slightly vague
rationale for for
one of the
suggestions. Minor
improvement
needed.
Two suggestions of
course materials for
Ken’s future
leadership
development are
provided,
supported with a
good but vague
rationale for two of
the suggestions to
Ken. Several
improvements
needed.
One suggestions of
course materials for
Ken’s future
leadership
development is
provided, but is
unsupported or
supported with a
poor and/or very
vague rationale.
No attempt to
make suggestions.
(1.4 – 1.5)
Criterion Score
/ 1.5
(0 – 0.8)
(0.9 – 1.0)
(1.05 – 1.1)
(1.2 – 1.3)
https://learn.umgc.edu/d2l/lms/competencies/rubric/rubrics_assessment_results.d2l?ou=625383&evalObjectId=3743774&evalObjectType=5&userId=338108&groupId=0&rubricId=1411940&d2l_body_ty…
3/6
4/15/22, 11:30 PM
Criteria
Follow
up/Response to
Classmate
Postings
(Quality). 3.0
Rubric Assessment – BMGT 365 7387 Organizational Leadership (2222) – UMGC Learning Management System
Equivalent to an A
Equivalent to a B
Equivalent to a C
Equivalent to a D
Equivalent to an F
3 points
2.55 points
2.25 points
1.95 points
0 points
Demonstrates
analysis of others’
posts; extends
meaningful
discussion by
building on
classmates and
instructors posts.
Uses at least two
different sources in
responding to
classmates that add
value to the
discussion.
Extends discussion
on an existing
posting with
further comment or
observation.
Occasionally uses
course materials
but needs some
development.
Contributions does
not enrich
discussion often
containing
statements such as:
I agree or disagree;
restates what
others stated;
evaluates the
quality of a post
adding no
substantial
comment. Some
evidence of course
materials use.
Contributions does
not enrich
discussion often
containing
statements such as:
I agree or disagree;
restates what
others stated;
evaluates the
quality of a post
adding no
substantial
comment. No
evidence of course
materials use.
Posts no follow-up
responses to
others.
(2.1 – 2.3)
(1.8 – 2.0)
(2.4 – 2.6)
Criterion Score
/3
(0)
(2.7 – 3.0)
Follow
up/Responses
to Classmate
Postings
(Quantity). 1.5
1.5 points
1.275 points
1.125 points
0.975 points
0 points
Responds to five or
more classmates.
Responds to four
classmates.
Responds to three
classmates.
Responds to two
classmates.
Responds to zero
or one classmate.
(1.35 – 1.5)
(1.2 – 1.34)
(1.05 – 1.19)
(0.9 – 1.04)
(0 – 0.89)
/ 1.5
https://learn.umgc.edu/d2l/lms/competencies/rubric/rubrics_assessment_results.d2l?ou=625383&evalObjectId=3743774&evalObjectType=5&userId=338108&groupId=0&rubricId=1411940&d2l_body_ty…
4/6
4/15/22, 11:30 PM
Criteria
Presentation
and Writing. 1.0
Rubric Assessment – BMGT 365 7387 Organizational Leadership (2222) – UMGC Learning Management System
Equivalent to an A
Equivalent to a B
Equivalent to a C
Equivalent to a D
Equivalent to an F
1 point
0.85 points
0.75 points
0.65 points
0 points
Contributes to
discussion with
clear and concise
comments that is
style appropriate,
rich in vocabulary
and excellent use of
grammar & spelling.
Contributes to
discussion with
understandable
comments but style
and vocabulary is at
times inconsistent
or imprecise,
and/or has minor
writing errors.
Contributes to
discussion with
understandable
comments but style
and vocabulary is at
times inconsistent
or imprecise,
and/or has several
writing errors.
Contributes to
discussion with
errors in clarity,
style, vocabulary
selection, and/or
has many writing
errors.
No evidence
of proofreading
or attempt at
applying
conventional writin
g mechanics, style
or vocabulary.
(0.6 – 0.6)
(0 – 0.5)
(0.8 – 0.8)
(0.7 – 0.7)
0.5 points
0.425 points
0.375 points
0.325 points
0 points
Excellent use of
APA. Posts contain
the appropriate
number of APA intext citations and
reference list
matches; few errors
are present.
Attempts in-text
citations and
reference list, but
some minor errors
in formatting exist.
Attempts in-text
citations and
reference list, but
errors in formatting
exist; paraphrasing
is not accurate or
in-text citations are
not used frequently
enough.
Attempts in-text
citations or
reference list, but
omits one or the
other. In-text
citations seldom
used.
No evidence of
APA used.
(0.9 – 1.0)
APA Style (7th
ed.). 0.5
(0.45 – 0.5)
(0.4 – 0.44)
Criterion Score
/1
/ 0.5
(0 – 0.2)
(0.3 – 0.34)
(0.35 – 0.39)
Total
/ 10
https://learn.umgc.edu/d2l/lms/competencies/rubric/rubrics_assessment_results.d2l?ou=625383&evalObjectId=3743774&evalObjectType=5&userId=338108&groupId=0&rubricId=1411940&d2l_body_ty…
5/6
4/15/22, 11:30 PM
Rubric Assessment – BMGT 365 7387 Organizational Leadership (2222) – UMGC Learning Management System
Overall Score
Equivalent to an A
Equivalent to a B
Equivalent to a C
Equivalent to a D
Equivalent to an F
9 points minimum
8 points minimum
7 points minimum
6 points minimum
0 points minimum
https://learn.umgc.edu/d2l/lms/competencies/rubric/rubrics_assessment_results.d2l?ou=625383&evalObjectId=3743774&evalObjectType=5&userId=338108&groupId=0&rubricId=1411940&d2l_body_ty…
6/6

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